Danur 2: Maddah [Review]

This horror film is dark, but for the wrong reasons.

Danur 2: Maddah

A clear creature bred on a Hollywood diet, director Awi Suryadi turns the reputation of the original Danur on its head, from placid title to heart-dropping ride with its sequel, Danur 2. But it may not have really worked.

For one thing, the film is too dark. Literally. Someone hand the lighting team a meter please, because half the time the actors seem disembodied. While the camera work is fairly daring and even inventive at times, the dim sets nullify the effect, because we are not too sure what we are really looking at. This plus the many dislocated scenes that don’t flow, cuts deep into the impact of Danur 2.

Young Risa (Prilly Latuconsina) finds her uncle acting strangely after she moves in. Initially suspecting an affair, her ability to see spirits indicate there is something else at play. With references to The Conjuring and Insidious, Suryadi applies the same formula to story and execution, hoping for the same success. But led by a distracted hand and the unprofessional lighting, the scares become more of the horror funhouse sort – entertaining at times but mostly annoying.

Throw in some sense to the story, turn up those amps, and Danur 3 might have a fighting chance.

 

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